Monday, 14 January 2013

Knitting a snood

I seem to be doing an awful lot of things at the moment! One of them is catching up on this piece of knitting which has been on the needles, by my estimate, for over two years now. Two years I hear you gasp in horror! Hmmmm, yes, it is rather a long time isn't it? I know it's that long, because I was just near the start when my dear soul and I went up to his daughter's just before Christmas two years ago - where her delightful puppy, Bella, thought that perhaps she could help and the whole thing nearly ended in a dreadful tangle! In my defence, it is 11 pattern repeats, of 20 rows each, over 240 stitches, round and round and round and round. But, at last, I'm nearing the end. Do you do Ravlery? I do, and its tremendously useful, because you can see what other people have done with the thing you are knitting. This "thing" is a snood, or it will be when it is finished; my second piece of lace knitting. It has a rather lovely, but scarily complicated looking edging, intended to be knitted separately and then attached. If done this way, it means counting out 120 pattern repeats, hoping your tension in this bit allows your edging to stretch all the way round, then laboriously sewing it on. So I had a look at what others had done, and found advice to knit the edging in with the rest of the knitting. Now that sounded even more scary, so I did several test rows first to make sure I understood what the edging involved before even thinking about incorporating it into the rest of the knitting.

Here's how it happens. You have a little group of seven stitches on your needle (which become nine for a while). You also have the rest of your knitting, on its circular needles (that extra shiny one is one end of this bit) dangling below the bit you're working on, all wriggly ....



at the end of every other row, you knit the final stitch together with the next stitch on the main piece, so you're trying to handle three needles and two bits of knitting with only two hands to do it all.



It's all rather finicky to start with as the circular needle that holds the lace squirms about and wiggle waggles like a live thing, and the little needles that hold the edging threaten to slip out of their stitches at every turn. You also have to make sure, after the knit the two bits together bit, that you push the stitches on the circular needle right back so they don't slip off while you continue with the edging. I finally I got the hang of it and now I am almost half way there. 


It's all coming together rather nicely, and the best bit about it is that you don't have to count the repeats; you know when it's done, because there are no more stitches on your squirmy circular needle and you're back to where you started again ... or at least, I hope that's where I'll be!

4 comments:

  1. I am in awe. I genuinely struggle with two sticks. This looks infinitely complicated and really quite lovely. And two years is no time at all to leave a project half-done *looks at shelves and cringes slightly*

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    1. moderate your awe - it really does look harder than it is; once you've mastered knit two together, pass slip stitch over and yarn round needle you're away. I was terrified of my first bit of "lace" and then pleasantly surprised when it was easier than I expected. Just keep practicing and rest on the (snuggly) laurels of your delicous ripple blanket!!

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  2. You see this is why you can knit and I can't - I don't have your patience. It looks brilliant, I am deeply impressed. I bought a cheap and cheerful snood the other week (fleece - not in the same league as the one you're making), and eldest daughter thought it was a great idea - apparently at nearly fifteen, she hadn't heard of snoods before - I may have failed in the motherhood stakes yet again...

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    1. But you have endless patience for your lovely stitching, not to mention the design skills that go into it; I'm simply following a pattern!
      I suspect your nearly 15 year old could have survived to adulthood quite unscathed without discovering what snoods are, so I think your motherhood skills are probably just about OK ;-) Mine will be 26 this year, which makes me feel a tad passe!!

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